Great name archive, 22-28 October 2012

Hero Nuus

Hero Nuus (and friend)

It’s been a busy few weeks for Name Curator but I’m finally on top of my archivist duties.

Some interesting names this week, including Hero Nuus and Moses Regular Jr (supplied by the incomparable namesmith Steve Rushin).

But of course, it’s impossible to go past Cynthia Chicken-Usher. Such a strange hyphenation: ‘Chicken’ on its name is intriguing, but to follow it up with ‘Usher’ elevates it to a level of brilliance I’ve rarely encountered.

Cynthia Chicken-Usher, I applaud you.

Hildegard Hammerschmidt-Hummel, German academic and Shakespeare death analyser

Garold Sneegas, US photographer and hogchoker/stoneroller snorkeler

Jurickson Profar, Curaçaoan baseballer and former Hickory Crawdad

Gaillard ‘Evil’ Peck, US pilot and Constant Peg program initiator

Crystal Starr, US videoblogger and fun building troller

Rudell Crim, US gridironer and ‘ooooh baby’ utterer

Bland Ballard, US soldier/legislator and tough looking man

Hero Nuus, animal trainer and hippopotamus feeder

Jovan Belcher, American footballer and stat jacker-upper

Rainer Werner Fassbinder, German director and vicious drug & sleeping pill combiner

Cynthia Chicken-Usher, British company director

Moses Regular Jr, American footballer and bullet-like projectiler

Cornell Capa, Hungarian/American photographer and non-artist

Peer Bork, German biochemist and diarrhoea sufferer email receiver

Abdulai Bell-Baggie, Sierra Leonean/English footballer and understated hinter

Great name archive, 15-21 October 2012

 

Isma'il Kushkush

Isma’il Kushkush

Wendell Wallach, US bioethicist & academic and friendly skeptic

Shabaan Banana, UK administrator and smooth day-to-day runner

Happy Jele, South African footballer and field of play misser

Isma’il Kushkush, freelance reporter and reflection capturer

Burl Doble and Chic Henry, Australian political candidates and hard line takers

Quandre Diggs, US footballer and hype purchaser

Melaina Shipwash, Miss Colorado 2010 and loaded question answerer

Graf von Wackerbarth, German general and quiet string puller

Manti Molemo Moholo, South African footballer & angry substitute

Mistaker Greenway, 19th century British baby and imaginative parent haver

Thor Tripp, US reporter and 7.5 burger eater

Teeboy Kamara, Liberian footballer and fresh blow incurrer

Paco Underhill, US environmental psychologist and in-store shopping advocate

Jean Lean, New Zealand student and earthquake practicer

Tyler Tettleton, US footballer and undisclosed abdomen injury sufferer

Great name archive, 1-7 October 2012

 

Hippolyte Tsafack

Hippolyte Tsafack

Amber Lawn, Australian sister and Malaysian jail visitor

Thurlow Weed, US political tyro and chronic vertigo sufferer

Junji Wiener, US lacrosser and ball shielder

Ermal Fraze, US tool company owner and aluminum can pull tab inventor

Bud Pidgeon, hunting fan & Saturday meeting organiser

Hippolyte Tsafack, Cameroonian hoopster and one-word answerer

Kenesaw Mountain Landis, US judge/baseball commissioner and real shorthand reporter

Bradley Wine, US criminal and public intoxicant

Titus Rubles, US basketballer and style translator

Carrie Coon, US actress and drooling man wake possessor

Kate Pumpa, exercise physiologist & calorie counter

Jean-Louis Akpa Akpro, French footballer and unafraid shooter

Helmut Pump, German waste manager and international advice provider

Christopher Christmas, US counsellor and Ball State University graduate

Rodrick Rumble, US gridironer and good-hearted people helper

‘Kevinism’, bad first names and ‘name-based interpersonal neglect’

Australian Foreign Minister, Kevin Rudd

Kevin Rudd, innocent victim of 'Kevinism'

When it comes to Germany, Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd’s name precedes him – and not in a good way.

He’s a victim of ‘Kevinism’, a term coined by German-speaking media to describe discrimination against people with ‘culturally devalued’ (read: bad, or bogan) names in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

(Chantal is another example of a ‘Kevinism’ name.)

Kevinism, and the broader effects a bad first name can have for people, are the subjects of a fascinating new paper* by German and US academics.

The key findings, based on surveys of some 12,000 participants:

  • Negative (read: bad) first names evoke negative interpersonal relations, which in turn influence life outcomes for the worse.
  • These life outcomes: Lower self-esteem, more smoking and less education.
  • Singles using an online dating site would rather stay single than commence a relationship with someone who had an undesirable name

There is a little bit of a ‘but’ (of course): the study was conducted on German (and obviously German-speaking) participants.

But still, the premise remains: like pets at Christmas, giving someone a bad name lasts a lifetime.

*On a purely selfish note, an extensive bibliography means lots  of other interesting name-based research to come. Good times!